Einstein@home sends workunits and receives completed work reports. Einstein@home Einstein@home is a distributed computing project from United States. 0.0 Einstein@home has not been rated by anyone yet! Click here to rate it!

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Total credit:
129,961,922,191
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Total user count:
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Project description

Einstein revolutionized our understanding of the universe and set the course for physics research in the twentieth century. Now, 50 years after his death and 100 years after his Special Theory of Relativity was published, we have the chance to confirm one of Einstein’s most important predictions. But we need your help – read on to find out why you should get involved. Einstein suggested that we live in a universe full of gravitational waves. He proposed that exploding stars, colliding black holes and other violent events create waves that alter space and time. We have not detected these waves yet because it requires tools sensitive enough to measure very small effects. It’s like trying to detect a change in the distance from the earth to the sun equal to the width of an atom. Einstein@Home uses private computers to process LIGO and GEO 600 data. Private computer owners can download software onto their computers that receives data from a central server. The computers process the data when they are not being used for other things, like email or word processing. Then, the computers send the processed data back to the server and can get more to analyze. Einstein@Home doesn’t affect how computers perform and you can stop it any time.

Recent RSS entries

  • Gravitational Wave search GPU App version
    Due to the excellent work of our French volunteer Christophe ...

    Gravitational Wave search GPU App version

    Due to the excellent work of our French volunteer Christophe Choquet we finally have a working OpenCL version of the Gravitational Wave search ("S6CasA") application. Thank you Christophe! This App version is currently considered 'Beta' and being tested on Einstein@Home. To participate in the Beta test, you need to edit your Einstein@Home preferences, and set "Run beta/test application versions?" to "yes". It is currently available for Windows (32 Bit) and Linux (64 Bit) only, and you should have a card which supports double precision FP in hardware. BM
    Created: April 11, 2014, 9:12 a.m. (modified): April 11, 2014, 9:12 a.m.

  • Gravitational Wave S6 Directed Search (CasA) ending
    We are nearing the end of the "S66CasA GW run". ...

    Gravitational Wave S6 Directed Search (CasA) ending

    We are nearing the end of the "S66CasA GW run". This means that only relatively few tasks of possibly remote frequency bands are available for this application, possibly resulting in an increased download volume per task. If you want to avoid this, you may opt-out of the "Gravitational Wave S6 Directed Search (CasA)" search in your Einstein@Home preferences on the web site. BM
    Created: Aug. 13, 2014, 12:41 p.m. (modified): Aug. 13, 2014, 12:41 p.m.

  • New radio pulsar discovered in Arecibo data
    Congratulations to our volunteers James Drews, UW-Madison and juergenstoetzel. Their ...

    New radio pulsar discovered in Arecibo data

    Congratulations to our volunteers James Drews, UW-Madison and juergenstoetzel. Their computers have discovered a new radio pulsar J1859+03, in data from the Arecibo Observatory PALFA survey. Drews works at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and is the ninth-ranked Einstein@Home volunteer, measured by total computing credits. This is his second pulsar discovery! Further details about these and other Einstein@Home pulsar discoveries can be found on this web page, and will be published in due course. Bruce Allen Director, Einstein@Home
    Created: Oct. 23, 2013, 12:44 p.m. (modified): Oct. 23, 2013, 12:44 p.m.

  • Syracuse University moves into first place!
    Congratulations to Syracuse University, which has passed the AEI E-Science ...

    Syracuse University moves into first place!

    Congratulations to Syracuse University, which has passed the AEI E-Science Group to move into FIRST PLACE among Einstein@Home contributors. Syracuse University has now contributed more computer cycles to the Einstein@Home search than any other participant. Thank you Syracuse!! Bruce Allen Director, Einstein@Home
    Created: Feb. 6, 2014, 9:19 p.m. (modified): Feb. 6, 2014, 9:19 p.m.

  • Einstein@Home Volunteers Discover Four "Young" Gamma-Ray Pulsars
    Congratulations to our volunteers: Thomas M. Jackson, Kentucky, USA Mak-ino, ...

    Einstein@Home Volunteers Discover Four "Young" Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Congratulations to our volunteers: Thomas M. Jackson, Kentucky, USA Mak-ino, Japan Doug Lean, Australia Hans-Peter Tobler, Germany NEMO computing cluster, UW-Milwaukee, USA Chen, USA David Z, Canada Test, France whose computers have found 4 new gamma-ray pulsars in data from the Large Area Telescope on board NASA's Fermi Satellite. These are the first gamma-ray pulsars ever discovered by Einstein@Home; only a few dozen such objects (spinning neutron stars whose pulsations are only visible via their gamma rays) are known. The scientific paper is available here (use PDF link on the top right-hand side) and will be published in the next hours in the Astrophysical Journal Letters. If you are interested in learning more, a press release and other materials concerning the discovery are also available on-line. Many thanks to all Einstein@Home volunteers, whose computers have made these exciting discoveries possible! Bruce Allen Director, Einstein@Home
    Created: Nov. 26, 2013, 9:17 a.m. (modified): Nov. 26, 2013, 9:17 a.m.

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Supported platforms

  • linux-32-bitDistributed computing supported client platform. Linux (32-bit) Einstein@home can run on Linux (32-bit).
  • linux-64-bitDistributed computing supported client platform. Linux (64-bit) Einstein@home can run on Linux (64-bit).
  • mac-os-x-1040Distributed computing supported client platform. Mac OS X (10.4.0+) Einstein@home can run on Mac OS X (10.4.0+).
  • windows-2000xpvista7-32-bitDistributed computing supported client platform. Windows 2000/XP/Vista/7 (32-bit) Einstein@home can run on Windows 2000/XP/Vista/7 (32-bit).
  • windows-2000xpvista7-64-bitDistributed computing supported client platform. Windows 2000/XP/Vista/7 (64-bit) Einstein@home can run on Windows 2000/XP/Vista/7 (64-bit).

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